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Can Parliament Survive? - Christopher Hollis

Hollis & Carter, 1949, Hardback in Dust Wrapper.
Condition: Good+ — in Good+ Dust Wrapper. Unlaminated dust wrapper a little edgeworn and faded with fraying at the tail of the spine. Price Clipped. Leans. Edges of the text block lightly spotted with tanning to the endpapers and blanks. Text complete, clean and tight.

From the cover: “Christopher Hollis here develops the argument that the age of universal suffrage and parliamentary government is also proving to be the time when parliaments are losing their power. This is particularly the case where-ever Socialist parties, by nationalising successive sections of industry, place them under a managerial control.

This penetrating and stimulating study of what is really happening traces how party government and parliament became the central institution of the national life, and how to-day, so much of that life, because it is industrialised, is being organised outside of and away from parliament. Industry is increasingly passing under the control of centralised bureaucracy, only in the vaguest sense responsible to Parliament or the public. Even if parliamentary control was accepted as proper policy, Parliament to-day is far too congested with business to be able to exercise it properly.

Mr. Hollis examines sympathetically the various suggestions that have been made to relieve parliament and to keep alive democratic authority by the creation of an Industrial Parliament, whether as a third chamber or a body like the Assembly of the Church of England. He argues that the present House of Commons will function much better, be able to restore more private members’ time, and discuss more private members’ bills, in proportion as it is relieved of ‘the details of industrial legislation for which it is manifestly incompetent’.

Overshadowing all the proposals is the great issue, how to preserve any real and effective liberty under modern conditions, and on this too, Mr. Hollis, as those who know his writing will expect, comes to grips with the real difficulties, and has much that is invigorating and constructive to say.”


Jacket designed by George Mansell. Size: 8¾" x 5½". Blue boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. 148 pages.
£7.50