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Wisdom Of The Wild: How We Treat Our Planet - Anon.

Word Wide Fund for Nature, 1993, Hardback in Dust Wrapper.
Condition: Very Good — in Very Good Dust Wrapper. Dust wrapper very slightly rubbed at the edges. Presentation plate to the first blank.

Illustrated with colour photographs. From the cover: “There is no turning back. There never has been in history. Two hundred million American citizens are not going to leave the USA just to give back to the Indians the land that was stolen from them. The Inuit in Greenland are not about to climb into their kayaks to paddle back up the river of history. The wisdom with which “wild” peoples have animated their world cannot be fetched back at will. Nevertheless, there is a great deal to learn. This, for example: how, on the threshold of the third millennium, can we live once again in a finite world without consuming it? Pedagogues tell us that children need elements of the wild and disorder in order to become mentally sound adults. The child in its den is said to be subconsciously remembering the feeling of safety which our ancestors experienced in caves in the childhood of mankind. In Sweden, they let children fly back to the beginnings of humanity on the wings of their imagination, as it were. The wild as a tonic.

Henry David Thoreau’s suggestion that every major city should have some wildness in its vicinity (because otherwise its inhabitants would revert to the wild) is almost one hundred and fifty years old — and highly topical in view of the frustration which people feel in our concrete bunkers.

An end must be put to the dominance of the right angle. Protection programmes for spacious areas of wilderness have one purpose, among others, namely to preserve the charm of untouched nature. Real-life magic! Magic, or rather cheap tricks — that is what our oh-so-en-lightened world thought of the healing knowledge of the jungle Indians for such a long time. Until, at the sight of the burning rain forests, they realised that the best pharmacy in the world was going up in flames.

The awareness of its utility should not be the rescuers’ sole motive, however. If we only take up arms in defence of the earth where our immediate living conditions are threatened, we shall soon be sitting amidst the ruins of a barren planet. It is (unfortunately, some would say) not the case that when the trees die, man also dies immediately. There are no trees in the Mongolian steppes, but they are still not dead. The fact is, as an Indian chief once said: “After the deaths of plants and animals, you will die of the great loneliness in your hearts.” An appeal has been filed against this death sentence. This book contains a few passages from the defence counsel’s speech.”


Foreword or introduction by Jingis Aitmatov. Size: 12" x 9½". Light Brown boards with Dark Brown titling to the Spine & Upper Board. 256 pages.
£16.50